Hip

Normal Anatomy of the Hip Joint

The thigh bone, femur, and the pelvis, acetabulum, join to form the hip joint. The hip joint is a “ball and socket” joint. The “ball” is the head of the femur, or thigh bone, and the “socket” is the cup shaped acetabulum.

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Hip Conditions

Femoro Acetabular Impingement (FAI)

Femoro acetabular impingement (FAI) is a condition where there is too much friction in the hip joint from bony irregularities causing pain and decreased range of hip motion. The femoral head and acetabulum rub against each

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Hip Fracture

The hip joint is a “ball and socket” joint. The “ball” is the head of the femur, or thigh bone, and the “socket” is the cup shaped acetabulum. The joint surface is covered by a smooth articular surface that allows pain free movement in the joint.

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Hip Surgery

Hip Arthroscopy

Arthroscopy, also referred to as keyhole or minimally invasive surgery, is a procedure in which an arthroscope is inserted into a joint to check for any damage and repair it simultaneously.

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Labral Reconstruction

A hip labral tear is an injury to the labrum, the cartilage that surrounds the outside rim of your hip joint socket. The hip joint is a ball and socket joint in which the head of the femur is the ball and the pelvic acetabulum forms the socket.

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Hip Reconstruction

Hip and knee are complex joints that bear our body weight and allow us to move. They make it possible for us to work, play and be active. They are made of articulating bones supported by ligaments, tendons, muscles and cartilage to provide function.

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